Super Roundup: Teaching Resources

General Topics–Some favorite topics that can be covered in most intro level humanities courses.

Reproductive Justice–An excellent, open source primer.

Reproductive Justice–Another excellent, open source primer, but more concise.

Hankivsky – Intersectionality 101 – 2014–A primer on the concept. After this, I usually have students do a short writing exercise in class or as a Blackboard quiz to have students illustrate their own intersectionality by coming up with a metaphor. Many students choose one from the reading and explain how it pertains to them and some students come up with very original ideas. Either way, it seems to help move the concept from theory to praxis.

Cassandra Among the Creeps–A great piece about how men reject women’s pain and women’s testimony to further patriarchal institutions. Perhaps particularly important if you are teaching about the Kavanaugh atrocity.

Capitalism–I wish this weren’t true but students are just more willing to hear criticism’s of capitalism from a white guy billionaire. Luckily, we have one offering some important critiques. I like to note that this talk was given in 2014 and since then the US government has doubled and tripled down on tax cuts for the wealthiest among us.

Income Inequality–Why, and how, it’s bad.

Wealth Gap–Last Week Tonight is a gift from the gods of teaching. It’s funny and, at the same time, is an example of what good research and critical thinking skills look like. It’s also 30 minutes at most so it fits even into a 50 minute class. I like to show this video the day after the Income Inequality video above. If the first clip illustrates the harms of income inequality this one does a pretty good job of explaining the politics of why it persists in the US and how it’s getting worse.

Last Week Tonight–Well, since I mentioned it . . .

Police Militarization

Food Waste

Gender Pay Gap–This one is short (under 8 minutes) and you can play the whole thing or the fake ad for LadyBucks starting at 5:57. However, I would really encourage showing the whole thing because there’s something about the line, “If someone takes a dump on my desk the size of the dump is not the issue.” I know it seems weird but if you are teaching feminist, gender or women’s studies in any way that one analogy in this episode can get you so much traction. Time and again students will want to bring things back to, “But women are almost equal in X,” or “But things in X are so much better for women than they were Y years ago” and something about being able to say, “Remeber, if you take a dump on my desk the size of the dump is not the issue” really forces them to focus on the ideology behind inequality. Listen, I wish there was a more eloquent, less scatological, way to get students to viscerally understand this concept but I just haven’t found one. In my 8 years of teaching about gender and sexuality this is the thing that gets the point across the most.

Miss America–This is another one where you can show the whole episode or the mini-pageant that sums up most of the main points of the episode which starts at 12:30 (but I would show the whole episode because it’s amazing).

Sex Ed–Yet again, you can show all 18 minutes or the summary clip starting at minute 17:53.

Medicaid Gap–If I’m teaching about the 2016 election, or if I were teaching now with the midterms approaching, I would 1000% show this video. “Economic anxiety” was listed as a reason that a lot of people voted for Trump in 2016 and that anxiety, when it was located, was often tied to healthcare costs. This video lays out, in detail, how Republicans exacerbated the healthcare crisis by refusing free money and voters, who did not know this, were angry at the ACA for not working.

International Women’s Day–If you happen to be teaching on March 8th then this is for you.

Student Debt–This may fuck them up a bit but they do deserve to know.

Paid Family Leave

The 2016 Election

GOP Rape Advisory Chart–Difficult, but essential, to read and to understand the misogyny of the US and the Republican party.

Welcome to Leith–Very hard to watch, but important to understand how white supremacy has been flourishing in the US since well before 2016.

“White Working Class” Narrative Is Nothing But A Racist Dog Whistle--A great piece about the myth of the white working class and the supposed economic anxiety that supported Trump.

On Men

The Lonely Legion–An incredibly important piece about why men are lonely, how women act as emotional bandaids, and why this makes men vulnerable to radicalization by white supremacists and misogynist groups.

Men Just Don’t Trust Women. And This Is A Problem.–An honest piece from one of my favorite authors.

Comedy Clips

As I mentioned earlier, I often begin class with a comedy clip vaguely related to something we’re talking about that day. Pedagogically, I do this because laughter releases serotonin which helps the brain store material in long-term memory. I also use a lot of these clips to remind students that we can bring a sense of lightness to serious subjects. It’s also a quick way to get students’ attention and can buy you an extra 3-5 minutes at the beginning of class if you need a moment to catch your breath for any reason. With that said, here are some of my favorite clips to begin class.

Let’s Generalize About Men–I love to use this clip to convey the absurdity of generalizing and also to cut through the sense of tension students can bring to class when we are talking about men or masculinity.

Very Adult Lesson on the 4 Sentence Types–Very much what it sounds like. You will know if your class can handle this type of comedy and it’s not appropriate for all institutions (I’m looking at you Christian colleges). I will say, it’s impossible to forget the sentence types after this clip.

Unlearn Toxic Masculinity–We don’t deserve Nore Davis. This routine touches on everything from what it means to be woke to student loans. ❤

Treat Nazis Like You Treat Women–‘Nough said.

On Growing Up Religious & Abstinent–If you’re teaching about sex-ed in the US this is a great one to start the day with.

Not An Alpha Male–Again, a great way to cover types of masculinity. Also, racism.

Aparna Nancherla–Is amazing and you should show all of her clips in your class at some point.

Ivan Decker–I will never not show this routine in a class.

Matthew Broussard–I love to use this clip before talking about sexuality to introduce students to using correct anatomical terms.

Shameless Self-Promotion

Inside the Duggars’ Dark World–My piece on the Duggars for the Ms. blog. It’s also about Christian Nationalism and misogyny.

Indiana’s Dangerous Anti-Abortion Laws are Mike Pence’s Legacy–Another piece for Ms. (always honored to work with them) that’s mostly about Christian Nationalism, misogyny, and state power.

Review: Dirty Computer–I got to co-author a review of my favorite artists with one of my favorite people and someone published it!

FDT and FBK

Y’all, I’m so tired in all the ways a human being can be tired. The change of seasons and this Brett Kavanaugh bullshit has got me exhausted and the only thing I’ve been doing for days–when I’m awake–is trying to find little things that don’t make me miserable. So, you know, I rewatched all of “The Good Place.”

I have, noticeably, stepped away from our Septemeber series on teaching. Every day I wake up and tell myself, “Write about how to teach intersectionality today. It’s more important than ever with all of this BS going on.” And every day I wind up eating cookies and watching Sailor Moon to not think about the interesting times we live in.

If I learned one thing in my teaching career it’s that  it can be incredibly powerful to bring your whole self to the classroom.

Of course, you shouldn’t do anything that you’re uncomfortable with but the quickest way to build trust in the classroom is to be vulnerable there–to model how to connect lived experience with classroom concepts.

If you, like me, are struggling right now–struggling to get out of bed, struggling to teach, struggling to exist–then I would encourage you to take that into the classroom. Chances are, a lot of your students are struggling as well and would appreciate a chance to talk about it.

We hear a lot these days about how our digital spaces are increasingly becoming echo chambers because of our ability to mute or block people who have differing views. Because of this, our classrooms have become even more important cultural spaces. They  are places where students are taught how to critically evaluate their opinions while also interacting with people who have different views and different life experiences. This can be incredibly important.

I know it certainly was for me when I was a young, extremely conservative student.

So, in light of all of this, I have just a few resources to share. The first category are things that help us get up and do shit. The second category are some teaching resources for your classroom.

Stuff That Makes Me Hate the World a Little Bit Less:

FDT, Part 1

FDT, Part 2

Wednesday Morning

Oh My God

Join The Fun!

Trump Is A Clown With a Knife

Stuff to Encourage Class Discussion, Hopefully:

Safe Spaces–I love this piece for explaining safe spaces to students: what they are, what they aren’t, why folks need them, and how they work. (Bonus Points if you can guide your students towards understanding that “man caves” are safe spaces for white men.)

Jokes Seth Can’t Tell–I love this regular segment on Late Night with Seth Meyers for introducing an example of people owning intersectional identities and how in-group and out-group language works.

Growing Up Poor–If you’re teaching in the US then it’s going to be incredibly hard to get your students to acknowledge, let alone talk about, class. I use comedy clips almost every class period to get things started and this one is, far and away, the perennial favorite. It can also spark some good dialogue about class differences.

Potato or Nazi–My favorite way to start a conversation about imperialism and cultural appropriation.

 

Using #MightyKacy to Teach Privilege

Earlier this week I said I would share my favorite lesson to teach students the concept of privilege. Understanding privilege is essential for understanding, well, pretty much anything else. However, a lot of students are initially resistant to the concept of privilege and the idea that they have it.

I was one of these students. When I was a junior in college and first learning about the concept of privilege through my work with the Bonner Leader’s program I was deeply uncomfortable with the concept. It felt as if someone was trying to tell me I had not earned my place at the institution. It felt like my hard work was being invalidated. I really, really, really could have used this article.

There are two fundamental truths of teaching (which no one ever tells you, for some reason). The first is that all of us teach first to who we were as students. The second is that the best teaching is a balance between earning your students’ trust enough to fuck up their day a little bit.

I’ve designed this lesson on privilege to do both of those things, reaching through the resistance students like me had to the concept of privilege and destabilizing their day the more they think about.

This lesson is adaptable to most humanities classes, is a stand alone, and can be adjusted to fit the length of your class period. The lesson as described below is designed to take up one full 50 minute class period.

First, have your students watch this video of Kacy Catanzaro, or #MightyKacy, at the 2014 Dallas Qualifiers. This is the first time that a woman completed the American Ninja Warrior qualifying course. The video is fun to watch and exciting whether you’ve seen it 50 times or it’s brand new. Have students watch it twice. The first time just to watch it and feel the excitement. The second time students watch it, when they know what to expect, ask them to listen to the commentary and watch the audience. You know your class best so if you think they need to then have them watch it a third time, possibly taking notes on the phrases that stick out to them.

After you’ve had them watch the qualifiers hit them with the 2014 Dallas Finals.

Have them repeat the same process they went through for the qualifying video with the finals.

After watching the videos guide students through discussing what they heard from the commenters and the fans.

They may notice a lot of different things from the fact that Kacy picked up some fans and a hashtag between the qualifiers and the finals to the fact that her BF and training partner calls her “one of the most talented athletes I’ve ever worked with.”

Guide them towards the observations the commenters made about her body–particularly about her “wingspan,” places her weight or height is a disadvantage, and so on.

These comments hint at the fact that the course was not built for Kacy’s body. It was built for a taller, heavier body.

This is privilege.

Privilege doesn’t mean that you hate individuals who are not like you. In fact, you can enthusiastically support them as individuals just as the commenters and fans enthusiastically support Kacy’s progress through the courses.

What privilege means is that the structure (in this example, the obstacle course) is built for certain types of bodies rather than others.

This doesn’t mean those other bodies can’t make it through the course–only that it is more difficult for them to do so.

Similarly, this doesn’t mean people who have the bodies the course is made for will automatically make it through the course, but it does mean they won’t face extra obstacles just by being who they are.

If you like, you can take this lesson even further.

The American Ninja Warrior obstacle course is made for certain types of bodies–but whose?

If you ask students who the course is made for they will tentatively answer, “Men.”

But #NotAllMen

If you have any Ninja Warrior enthusiasts in your class they will likely know that American Ninja Warrior is a popular spinoff of the original Japanese game show. That does not explain, however, why ANW became an American sensation when other Japanese game shows, like the brilliant Hole In The Wall, did not.

The answer can be found in, of all places, WWII. After WWII Japan dissolved it’s Army and the US established a strong military presence in bases all over Japan. Competing in the original Ninja Warrior became a popular pastime for American soldiers on leave in Japan.

American soldiers who liked competing in the show, and their families who wanted to watch them, created a market for an American version of the show.

Thus, the American Ninja Warrior obstacle course isn’t built for every male body. It is built explicitly for the bodies of American soldiers.

In essence, we have the glory that is American Ninja Warrior because of the United States’ military and cultural imperialism.

This is the other lesson of privilege: being a member of the American armed-forces doesn’t guarantee you will make it through the ANW obstacle course but it does increase your odds because the structure was, literally, built for you.